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The On Ramp

The Blue Mountain Internet Customer Newsletter

 Issue # 42 April 2007 
NEWSLETTER CONTENTS
  • Greetings from the Edi...
  • New BMI AntiVirus Soft...
  • Picture Find Puzzle
  • Traveling With BMI
  • MSN Wi-Fi Hot Spot Loc...
  • Food on the Go
  • The Great Outdoors
  • Yard Crossword Puzzle
  • Traveling with BMI Email
  • Reading on the Go
  • Movie Review
  • Geographic Information...
  • Transportation Wordfind
  • KUDOS


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  • Geographic Information Systems
    by Jon Alexander
    April 2007

    Kids, want to take your next vacation home with you? Check out GIS .
    GIS stands for Geographic Information Systems. GIS is a mapping technology that allows the user to create and interact with a variety of maps and data sources.

    GIS integrates databases with geo-referenced spatial data (maps tied to specific known locations). In other words GIS allows the user to create visual displays of tabular information.

    In a GIS, the user is able to decide how the data will be displayed. GIS projects can range from global projects to site specific (such as a school and school yard). Educators and their students can collect and create their own data and use the GIS to display the data and analyze the results.

    In the strictest sense, it is a computer system capable of integrating, storing, editing, analyzing, sharing, and displaying geographically-referenced information. In a more generic sense, GIS is a tool that allows users to create interactive queries (user created searches), analyze the spatial information, edit data, maps, and present the results of all these operations. Geographic information science is the science underlying the applications and systems, and is taught as a degree program by several universities.

    Geographic information system technology can be used for scientific investigations, resource management, asset management, environmental impact assessment, urban planning, cartography, criminology, history, sales, marketing, and route planning. For example, a GIS might allow emergency planners to easily calculate emergency response times in the event of a natural disaster, a GIS might be used to find wetlands that need protection from pollution, or a GIS can be used by a company to find new potential customers similar to the ones they already have and project sales due to expanding into that market. Visit Geographic Information Systems Now.

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    The On Ramp is a monthly publication of Blue Mountain Internet.

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